Mike Cairnduff from Hello Teacher!

September 23, 2018
Mike Cairnduff

Last updated: November 16, 2018
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Mid-Autumn Festival 2018

On Monday, September 24, China will celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival 2018.

Also known as the Moon Festival or Mooncake Festival, it’s celebrated when the moon is believed to be at its fullest.

A full moon is an auspicious sign in China. The round shape symbolizes family reunion, as well as harmony and happiness.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is about families getting together and celebrating this special time of year.

For quick information about the Mid-Autumn Festival check out the Q&A below, or simply keep reading for more details about this unique holiday.

Quick Q&A about the Mid-Autumn Festival

What date is Mid-Autumn Festival celebrated in 2018?

This year, it's celebrated on Monday, September 24. The date changes each year according to the Chinese lunar calendar.

How did it begin?

When people started offering food to the moon in ancient times.

What do people give each other for Mid-Autumn Festival?

Moon cakes are a popular and traditional gift.

Mid-Autumn Festival mooncakes

Mooncakes are given, shared and eaten! (Photo: Wee Keat Chin on Flickr).

Why do Chinese people like the moon so much?

The moon is very significant in Chinese culture. It’s the main feature in many ancient myths and legends.

How do you say Mid-Autumn Festival in Chinese?

In pinyin it’s ‘zhong qiu jie’ (中秋节).

How do you wish someone a happy Mid-Autumn Festival?

You can say ‘zhong qiu kuai le’ (中秋快乐). There are other festival greetings too.

How do people celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival?

Spending time with family and friends, travelling and eating mooncakes.

Does China celebrate any other holidays?

Yes, there are numerous other holidays in China. Chinese New Year is the most important.

More information about the Mid-Autumn Festival

What is the story behind the Mid-Autumn Festival?

According to Chinese mythology, in ancient times there were 10 suns in China. Life was very hard for people because it was so hot.

An archer named Hou Yi shot down nine of the suns. As a result, the world became a more comfortable place.

Hou Yi was given a special elixir by the Queen of Heaven. If you drank it you would immediately go to heaven and become a god or goddess.

Hou Yi chose not to drink the elixir but instead give it to his beautiful wife, Chang E. However, an evil being wanted to steal the elixir.

To protect the elixir and protect her husband’s fate, Chang E drank it.

She flew up into the sky and landed on the moon. Hou Yi grieved and mourned his wife.

Mid-Autumn Festival full moon

Legend has it that Chang E flew to the moon to protect her husband from evil.

He yelled out her name and was amazed to see a figure appear on the moon. It was Chang E!

Since that day, Hou Yi and all the villagers began offering food to the moon, and praying for peace and good luck.

This happens every year around mid-autumn time, hence the Mid-Autumn Festival.

How do people celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival?

Chinese people celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival by visiting family members and close friends.

They often share a delicious feast of seasonal food that represents the new harvest.

The vacation is an opportunity to slow down, enjoy the simple pleasures in life and appreciate the moonlight.

People eat and give each other mooncakes, a traditional symbol of the festival. They may also admire or decorate brightly colored lanterns.

Lanterns at Mid-Autumn Festival 2018

Lanterns hanging up for Mid-Autumn Festival 2018.

What do people eat during the Mid-Autumn Festival?

Mooncakes are the most traditional food eaten at this time of year.

They’re round like a full moon and a symbol of reunion and happiness.

Mooncakes are essentially a nice-tasting bakery treat. The taste is similar to a fruit-based biscuit – sweet but not overly sweet.

The pastry shell is relatively firm, and the inside is dense. Red bean paste and fruit are popular fillings.

Mooncakes are usually decorated on top with Chinese characters or intricate patterns.

If you want to try making your own, here is a recipe for lotus seed mooncakes.

Other popular food eaten during the Mid-Autumn festival includes seasonal food like crabs and round food like pumpkins and watermelons.

The pumpkin tradition dates back to ancient China where poor people who couldn’t afford mooncakes would eat pumpkin instead.

For more information on the food eaten during Mid-Autumn Festival, and why it’s significant, check out this handy video.

Why mooncakes are important (from an economic standpoint)

According to The Economist, mooncakes are a useful indicator of consumption trends.

Mooncakes play this role because of their status as gifts. Ahead of the Mid-Autumn holiday, companies give them to employees and business contacts exchange them.

Consumption of mooncakes is thus less a reflection of whether people actually enjoy the pastries, and more a measure of the health of the Chinese economy.

This year, the Chinese Bakery Association has forecast that sales of mooncakes will increase by 5-10%.

Who would have thought that the humble mooncake says so much about the state of China’s economy?

Should I travel in China during the Mid-Autumn Festival?

Like all holiday periods in China, the Mid-Autumn Festival is a popular time for people to travel.

It’s advisable to hold off on any non-essential travel unless you’re willing to put up with long queues and busy train stations.

People queuing up in China

Queues can be long in China, especially during holiday periods.

If you’re working as a teacher in the public sector in China, you only get Monday off so it doesn’t leave a lot of travel time anyway.

How many days off work are there for Mid-Autumn Festival?

In 2018, the festival is officially celebrated from 22-24 September.

Although it sounds like a three-day vacation, for most people in China it’s just the Monday off work.

In a week’s time it’s the National Day holiday, so it’s a good time of year if you’re teaching in China.

Happy Mid-Autumn Festival 2018 everyone!

How will you be celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival this year?



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